Thursday, October 7, 2010

Get To Know Margaret Tanner!!

Wah-Hoo! We've got the incomparable MARGARET TANNER here with us today!!

Her new release, THE RELUCTANT FATHER, is set during the volatile Vietnam era and features a dashing playboy intent on playing the field. When he meets an irresistible woman who longs for marriage and the pitter-patter of little feet, he's faced with one tough decision. Can a tiger really change his stripes? LOL I guess we'll have to read Jordan and Sarah's story to find out! ;)

Better top off your cup and sneak a sweet treat, because Margaret is taking us on a jaunt into the past--her past, that is!

Cheerio and away we go!!



Thanks for inviting me to your blog Sarah. I will award an e-copy of either of my Vietnam War novels, Reluctant Father or Cardinal Sin to one lucky commentator.

I have always been a writer from as far back as I can remember. I used to write these pitiful sad little ditties then I moved on to short stories. I was quite successful with short stories, had a few published and won a few contests. One contest I remember entering was for a sock company and the prize was twenty pairs of men’s socks. Guess who won? Dad and my brother were very happy, so were their feet.

I graduated to novel writing and fell in love.
I write historical romance, usually of the nineteenth or twentieth century variety. I have written two novels with a Vietnam War background, Cardinal Sin, and my latest release, Reluctant Father, both from TWRP.
http://www.thewildrosepress.com/margaret-tanner-m-281.html

At the risk of revealing my age, I have to say the 1960’s was my time. Mini skirts, stilettos (I’ve bunions to prove it), beehive hair dos, I couldn’t quite manage that, although I did tease the life out of my hair and regularly put in coloured rinses, French Plum or Rich Burgundy, were the colours I favoured. I can remember when the Beatles made their first visit out to Australia. A couple of girls I worked with were lucky enough to get tickets to their concerts, (we hated them, of course), they came to work the next days minus their voices, and stayed that way for about a week, because they had screamed so much.

We used manual typewriters in those days. One original and four copies of everything we typed. I don’t know how many blouses I ruined because I got ink on the sleeves from changing the typewriter ribbon or the black stuff off the carbon paper.

During this time the Vietnam War loomed in the background. The Australian government introduced conscription. It was in the form of a ballot, or the death lottery as many called it. All twenty year old males had to register, their birth dates were put into a barrel and a certain number were drawn out, and those young men had to report to the army and subsequently many of them were sent to Vietnam. This of course caused severe bitterness and division in the community, and even though the government denied it, was subject to abuse and unfairness. Rich men kept their sons at university so they didn’t have to go. Conscientious objectors were thrown into prison. Only sons were called up, yet families with two or three eligible males didn’t have any of their boys called up.

I only had one brother, and I can clearly remember my father (a World War 2 veteran) vowing, that if his son got called up, he would protest on the steps of the parliament with a placard on his back.

There were protests marches, anti-war demonstrations, and things often turned violent. Not that I went to any of the protest marches, but a cousin of mine did and got trampled by a police horse. A very turbulent time in our history and I was right in the middle of it.


BIO:
Margaret Tanner is a multi-published Australian author. She loves delving into the pages of history as she carries out research for her historical romance novels, and prides herself on being historically correct. No book is too old or tattered for her to trawl through, no museum too dusty. Many of her novels have been inspired by true events, with one being written around the hardships and triumphs of her pioneering ancestors in frontier Australia. She once spent a couple of hours in an old goal cell so she could feel the chilling cold and fear

Margaret is a member of the Romance Writers of Australia, the Melbourne Romance Writers Group (MRWG) and EPIC. She won the 2007 and 2009 Author of the Year at AussieAuthors.com. Frontier Wife from TWRP won 1st prize in the historical romance section of the 2010 Readers Favourite Awards


RELUCTANT FATHER BLURB:
Jordan Stamford is allergic to babies. At the height of the Vietnam war, this jet-setting playboy, whose motto is ‘money can buy anything,’ arrives in Sarah Watson’s seaside home to redevelop a disused factory complex. Sarah is the only child of an elderly minister of religion and adores her bay side home. She yearns for a loving husband and babies. Will Jordan’s shameful family history and Sarah’s desperate longing for a child, be an insurmountable barrier for them to overcome?

EXCERPT:
“Look at this horrible thing, Lisa. You’ll have to pay someone to take it away.”
Sarah Watson squatted on the ground and shoved the moth-eaten deer’s head under the trestle table.

“You wouldn’t get me touching it,” Lisa said. “Have you met Jordan Stamford yet?”

“No, and I don’t want to, he’s going to wreck Lewis Inlet.”

“But he’s gorgeous.”

“I couldn’t care less what he looks like. Ouch!” Sarah banged her head on the table as she went to get up. A pair of expensive shoes and the hem of tailored sports pants came into her line of vision. “Coming here with his big city ideas and flashy car.” She climbed to her feet. “Lording it up at the big house. Who does he think he is, anyway?” She tossed her head, and her jet-black curls danced.

“And you are?” The owner of the expensive shoes savaged her with a contemptuous sweep of his ebony eyes.

“Hi, Mr. Stamford.” Lisa recovered herself first.

Angry red stained his tanned cheeks as his nostrils flared. “Don’t let me interrupt your character assassination.”

Sarah’s cheeks burned, and not just because of her uncharacteristic rudeness. This man was dynamite. She tried to bluster her way out of this embarrassing situation. “I’m Sarah Watson. Interested in snapping up a bargain, Mr. Stamford?”

“No, thank you.” He stalked off.

“He heard you,” Lisa croaked.

“I know. I must have sounded like some crazed shrew, but he is going to destroy our way of life. He’s already started to bulldoze the old flour mill complex. It’s been empty for so long we’ll probably have a rat plague.”

Lisa turned to help a customer, while Sarah inwardly cringed at her ill-mannered attack. She had let her runaway tongue get the better of her only because she cared about the inlet and didn’t want some get-rich-quick outsider with grandiose plans to desecrate it.

“The swamp is a breeding ground for pelicans and other wild birds. It will all be lost if Stamford and his greedy cronies drain…” A sudden swarm of customers surging around the table cut off her tirade, and for the next hour they were frantically busy. At one point she found herself quickly counting a handful of five-cent pieces handed over by a small boy in exchange for a pile of comic books.

The school bazaar was normally well patronized by the locals of this small seaside community. That’s why I like living here, everyone is so friendly. A large noisy factory and big-city attitudes would spoil our tranquil existence. It can’t be wrong to cherish the past, to tenaciously hang on to such an appealing lifestyle.

Brushing aside a wayward curl, she felt heat like a blow torch being trained on her back. She swung around and her gaze tangled with that of Jordan Stamford. He stood next to Mr. Collins, the school principal. When they sauntered toward her, she braced herself to do battle with this intruder who was hell bent on destroying the inlet. Had he complained about her rudeness? She tried to excuse her behavior. It had been dreadful, but she did it for the best of reasons – to save the inlet.


For more information on Margaret Tanner, please visit her website: http://www.margarettanner.com/


WOWZA! What an awesome way to kick off the weekend! THE RELUCTANT FATHER definitely sounds like a read that is guaranteed to satisfy. I'd like to thank Margaret for her wonderful post and giveaway!! My pops was an MP with the Air Force stationed in the Philippines back in the late 60's. His stories of the life and times back then never cease to amaze me--just as Margaret's did today. I only have one complaint: Where's the pic of a sassy Miss Tanner sporting a mini-skirt, a mile high hair-do, and a pair of come-and-get-me stilettos? *wink wink*

THANK YOU, TLN'ers!! I'm feeling a little patriotic thanks to Margaret's lovely post, so here's
DONNA LYNN singin' NAVY BLUE!! I live in a naval base town and let me tell ya there ain't nothing better than hearing those jets rumble with the sound of freedom . . . and getting to ogle the hotties in military uniforms isn't such a bad thing either. ;) Have a wonderful weekend! See ya back on 'Moan'day!!

29 comments:

Susan R. Mills said...

Looks like a good one to me! Thank you both for the awesome interview.

Vonnie Davis said...

Great interview! I, too, am a child of the sixties. Mini-skirts, teased hair, huge purses with huge cans of hair spray in them and bras stuffed with kleen-x. War riots and civil rights marches were on everyone's mind. My husband has a novel coming out in Nov. from that era. "The Phantom Lady of Paris" deals with many of the issues you menitoned in your blog. I wish you great book sales! From reading your excerpt, I'm sure you have a fabulous book to share.

Marg said...

Sounds like a good read to me. I was not around in the 60s but have certainly heard plenty about those turbulent yet prosperous years

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Sarah,
Thank you so much for inviting me to visit.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Susan,
Thank you for dropping by, I really appreciate it.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Vonnie,
Thanks for commenting. The 60's were an exciting era, I had forgotten about stuffing my bra with tissues, hankderchiefs were not half bad padding either. My sister wore a pair of "falsies" for enhancement. Congratulations to your husband on his upcoming novel.
Regards
Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Marg,
Thanks for dropping by. Pity you weren't around in the sixties you missed out on an exciting time.

Regards

Margaret

Linda Swift said...

Hi Margaret, great interview. Thanks for the walk down memory lane. It was a different kind of time for sure. And to think, no computers nor even electronic typewriters. You made me remember the chore it was to type everything back when. And no cell phones. How did we manage? Your book sounds like another Margaret Tanner success. I want to read it soon. Linda

Emma Lai said...

Wonderful interview, ladies! Margaret, I received my first manual typewriter when I was eight or so. I loved the blue monster and typed many a bad stories on it just to hear the clickety-clack of the keys. I still like computer keyboards that make noise when I strike them. Who wants silence?

aarbaugh said...

Well, I have one foot in the 60s, but I was young and didn't see it like others did. Your novel sounds very interesting. I love that you're so particular about historical accuracy.

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Linda,
Thanks for dropping. Oh yes, the manual type writer. Remember the one original and three or four carbon copies we had to do? And if you missed out typing a word near the bottom of the page you had to re-type the whole wretched page again.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Wow Emma.
Thanks for dropping by. Eight when you received your first manual typewriter. I was working and had to buy my own, an old Smith Corona.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi aarbaugh,
So sorry I don't know your christian name. Thank you so much for dropping by, I really appreciate it.

Regards

Margaret

Cheryl said...

Margaret,
As always, I loved reading about you and your books. Sarah is a wonderful hostess, and your interview was great. I was born in 1957, so I was definitely a child of the 60's. WOW what a time to grow up--I wouldn't trade it for anything. I can't wait to read this book!
Hugs,
Cheryl

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Cheryl,
Thanks for dropping by. Yes, Sarah sure is a great hostess.Born in 1957, yep that certainly makes you a child of the 60's.

Regards

Margaret

Autumn Jordon said...

Margaret, I loved reading your memories of the 60's. I was a tad too young to dye my hair, so I dyed Barbie's. Lol.

The Reluctant Father sounds like a fun read. Man, I can't wait to get my kindle for my B-day. Congrats on your new release.

Carol Ann said...

Hi Margaret,
I love the excerpt for Reluctant Father. Your characters have already grabbed me. It's funny thinking of the 60's as being so long ago! I remember it well...boy, my hair was big back then! Manual typewriters...oh, boy...and carbon paper! Yikes, I'd try to be very careful and at the very end came the dreadful mistake which couldn't be corrected. Remember when white out became popular? The carbons still looked terrible! Can't wait to read Reluctant Father. Best of luck on sales, my friend.

Susan Macatee said...

Great interview, Margaret! I remember the sixties, though I was in grade school at the time. Didn't start high school till '68. But I do remember Flower Power, mini-skirts, colored tights, even fishnet stockings.

It was a truly unique decade. Best of luck with your new release! Can't wait to read it!

Donna B said...

Oh my goodness, this sounds great! What tension in just this little excerpt! I can't wait to read it!

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Donna,
Thanks for dropping by I appreciate it.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Autumn,
I hope Barbie enjoyed having her hair dyed. French plum/rich burgundy were the colours I favoured.

Regards

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Carol Ann.
White out! Now that was the ultimate if you could get your hands on it, which mere little typists in the typing pool couldn't. Only the secretaries got that luxury, and they had electric typewriters too.
My hair-do used to add about a foot to might height.

Cheers

Margaret

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Susan,
Thanks for dropping by. I forgot about the fish-net stockings. And what about the suspender belt before we had panty hose????

cheers

Margaret

Caroline Clemmons said...

Margaret, I enjoyed Frontier Wife so much that I can hardly wait to read this book. Don't enter me in the drawing, though, because I won Frontier Wife. I loved that book and can hardly wait to read Reluctant Father. Now that I have a Kindle, I can order several of my favorite authors' books. That means yours, of course! Best of luck with slaes and future books.

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Caroline,
Thank you so much for dropping by, I appreciate your flattering comments. Praise indeed from a gifted writer like yourself.

Regards

Margaret

Kaily Hart said...

Great interview, ladies! Best of luck, Margaret with the book!

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Kaily,
Thank you so much for dropping by, I really appreciate it.

Regards

Margaret

Redameter said...

Margaret you took me back, oh how I remember those old typewriters and the ink and the smudges all over me.

And the the computers came along and I pulled my hair out trying to learn how to operate them. Wow, we've come a long way baby!

Well, it was a great interview and I enjoyed the memory lane.

Thanks a lot.
Love and blessings
Rita

Margaret Tanner said...

Hi Rita,
Thank you for dropping by I appreciate it.

Cheers

Margaret